3,275 Results
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William Howard Taft in Panama
Author: Library of Congress
Source: World Digital Library
Type: Video
Description:
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This film shows a visit of President William Howard Taft to inspect construction work on the Panama Canal, probably in November 1910. Taft previously had served as secretary of war in the cabinet of President Theodore Roosevelt, where he played a role in the development of the canal and made many visits to Panama. The film shows a crowd of men and women on a dock, posing for the camera. A boat pulls into an unidentified harbor, with Taft and General George W. Goethals, chief engineer of the Panama Canal ...
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Panama Canal: Scenes of the Finished Canal
Author: Library of Congress
Source: World Digital Library
Type: Video
Description:
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This film shows the operation of the Panama Canal in 1919, five years after its completion and opening to ocean-going traffic. The film follows the passage through the canal from the Atlantic to the Pacific by an unidentified ship. The vessel passes by the Panamanian city of Colón on the Atlantic end of the canal and through the channel to Gatun Locks and into Gatún Lake. Views of the Gatun spillway and the Chagres River are shown. From there the ship passes through the Gaillard Cut (Culebra Cut), into the ...
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Theodore Roosevelt Speaking in Panama, November 1906
Author: Library of Congress
Source: World Digital Library
Type: Video
Description:
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In November 1906, President Theodore Roosevelt went to Panama to inspect progress on construction of the Panama Canal, the first time a sitting U.S. president had left the United States to visit a foreign country. This film shows the welcoming ceremony for Roosevelt at the cathedral in Panama City. Roosevelt, President Manuel Amador Guerrero of Panama, and two unidentified men are seen arriving and standing on a platform on the steps of the cathedral. There is also a shot of two women arriving at the ceremony, one of whom ...
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Theodore Roosevelt's Arrival in Panama, November 1906
Author: Library of Congress
Source: World Digital Library
Type: Video
Description:
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In November 1906 President Theodore Roosevelt went to Panama to inspect progress on construction of the Panama Canal, the first time a sitting U.S. president had left the United States to visit a foreign country. This film shows the welcoming ceremony for Roosevelt at the cathedral in Panama City. There are views of the processional, including a marching band and escorts on horseback, as spectators gather. Roosevelt, President Manuel Amador Guerrero of Panama, and two unidentified men are seen arriving and standing on a platform on the steps of ...
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Doctor William Gorgas
Author: Library of Congress
Source: World Digital Library
Type: Video
Description:
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This short film consists of views of Dr. William Crawford Gorgas (1854−1920), chief sanitation officer (1904−13) to the Isthmian Canal Commission in Panama. Gorgas is shown standing in front of a building at an undetermined location. The remainder of film shows Gorgas and an unidentified man riding on a Panama Railroad train. The two men are silhouetted against passing scenery of the Canal Zone as Gorgas indicates to the other man points of interest. The train passes a body of water that is probably a part of the ...
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AWOL, Or, All Wrong Old Laddiebuck
Author: Library of Congress
Source: World Digital Library
Type: Video
Description:
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This short film was made in about 1919 by Charles R. Bowers (1889‒1946), a slapstick comedian and cartoonist, and distributed by the American Motion Picture Corporation, as a cautionary tale for troops impatient to return home after the November 1918 armistice that ended World War I. A “laddiebuck” or “laddybuck” was a mildly insulting slang term—a lad is a boy or young man, and a buck here refers to a young horse—hence, this laddiebuck is an ill-mannered youth, like an unbroken horse. He is complaining to his ...
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San Francisco's Future
Author: Library of Congress
Source: World Digital Library
Type: Video
Description:
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By mid-1916, the images of carnage in Europe and Germany’s submarine attacks on Allied shipping turned U.S. public opinion against Austria and Germany, increasing the likelihood of American participation in World War I. “Preparedness” demonstrations, to bolster support for the American military should the nation enter the war, were organized nationwide, particularly in important cities such as New York, Washington, DC, and San Francisco. Radical labor was a small but vociferous minority, opposed to U.S. involvement in the war, capable of stirring up labor unrest and provoking ...
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Under Four Flags
Author: Library of Congress
Source: World Digital Library
Type: Video
Description:
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Presented here is the third United States Government Official War Film of World War I, issued in 1919 by the United States Army Signals Corps. The 25-minute black-and-white movie was shot on location in mid‒late 1918, mostly in France. Photographic Section teams, consisting of one motion-picture cameraman, one still-picture cameraman, and assistants, were attached to each of the divisions with the American Expeditionary Forces. The picture moves somewhat jerkily and visually is of uneven quality. However, the scenes are not staged and convey with great immediacy the devastation and ...
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Assembling a Generator, Westinghouse Works
Author: Library of Congress
Source: World Digital Library
Type: Video
Description:
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Assembling a Generator, Westinghouse Works is one of 21 short films made at various Westinghouse Electric & Manufacturing Company plants in April–May 1904 and shown at the Westinghouse Auditorium at the 1904 Saint Louis World’s Fair. The films average about three minutes each. This film, most likely made at the Westinghouse plant in East Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, shows a group of men at work on various parts of a large generator, assembling the pieces. A crane carries a large part over to the rest of the machine and the ...
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Steam Hammer, Westinghouse Works, 1904
Author: Library of Congress
Source: World Digital Library
Type: Video
Description:
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Steam Hammer, Westinghouse Works is one of 21 short films made at various Westinghouse Electric & Manufacturing Company plants in April–May 1904 and shown at the Westinghouse Auditorium at the 1904 St. Louis World’s Fair. The films average about three minutes each. This film, made at the Westinghouse plant in East Pittsburgh, shows workmen using an enormous steam hammer to fashion a large part for an industrial machine. With the help of a crane, the workers lift a block of heated steel from a furnace to a table ...
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Bouncing Baby
Author: State Library and Archives of Florida
Source: World Digital Library
Type: Video
Description:
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The film Bouncing Baby, featured here, is a prime example of the works produced by the Vim Comedy Company in Jacksonville, Florida, during the early years of silent films. Favorable weather, political support, and cheap real estate and labor helped to make Jacksonville a major center for motion picture production in this period. The mayor of Jacksonville in 1915−17, J.E.T. Bowden, set out to restore business confidence in northeastern Florida after a recessionary slump and extended an open invitation “to the moving picture fraternity of this country ...
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Florida's Canal Main Street
Author: State Library and Archives of Florida
Source: World Digital Library
Type: Video
Description:
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Interest in constructing a water route across the Florida peninsula goes back to the colonial rule of the Spanish and the British and continued when Florida became a territory of the United States in 1821. The earliest American surveys for a possible canal in Florida were undertaken in the wake of excitement surrounding the opening of the Erie Canal in 1825. President Franklin D. Roosevelt authorized the first significant work on a cross-Florida canal as part of New Deal public works programs in Florida. After much debate, construction on route ...
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Waters of Destiny
Author: State Library and Archives of Florida
Source: World Digital Library
Type: Video
Description:
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The systematic drainage of the Florida Everglades began in earnest in 1905. Napoleon Bonaparte Broward, then Florida’s governor, committed significant state funds and solicited federal assistance in order to reclaim from underutilization the vast swamplands south of Lake Okeechobee. The ultimate goal of the Everglades reclamation was to access rich “muck” soil, covered in many areas by a thin layer of freshwater. Muck soil consisted of thousands of years of organic material accumulated on top of limestone bedrock. The muck made for ready and productive topsoil, but was quickly ...
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Working Catholic Youth’s Second National Congress and Convention of 100 Marriages, Montreal, 1939
Author: National Library and Archives of Quebec
Source: World Digital Library
Type: Video
Description:
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The Jeunesse ouvrière catholique (Working Catholic Youth) in Quebec produced this silent film in 1939, which depicts the Congrès des cent mariages (Convention of 100 Marriages) on the occasion of its Second National Congress. The film is in the Fonds d’archives de la Jeunesse ouvrière catholique (Working Catholic Youth Archive) at the Quebec National Library and Archives. The Canadian group was modeled after the “Jeunesse ouvrière chrétienne,” (JOC—Young Christian Workers) a Roman Catholic movement lead by Joseph Cardijn (1882–1967), a Belgian cardinal who founded it in 1912 ...
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Maple Sugar and Cooperation
Author: National Library and Archives of Quebec
Source: World Digital Library
Type: Video
Description:
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Produced by the Producteurs de sucre d'érable du Québec (Maple Sugar Producers of Quebec) and directed by Father Maurice Proulx (1902–88), this 1955 film features the history of the organization and its new techniques for maple syrup production, from scientific standardization in laboratories to advanced wrapping and packaging. Proulx, trained in agronomy before becoming a filmmaker, made 36 films for industry and the provincial government between 1934 and 1961. The film begins with the tapping and collecting of the maple sap in the springtime. It explains how Quebec ...
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