18 Results
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The Information Literacy User’s Guide: An Open, Online Textbook
Author: Allison Hosier
Source: Open SUNY Textbooks
Type: Textbook
Description:
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The Information Literacy User’s Guide introduces students to critical concepts of information literacy as defined for the information-infused and technology-rich environment in which they find themselves. This book helps students examine their roles as information creators and sharers and enables them to more effectively deploy related skills. This textbook includes relatable case studies and scenarios, many hands-on exercises, and interactive quizzes.
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Information Literacy
Author: Nasser Maksoud (MECC); Dorothy Connelly (BRCC); Diane Phillips (SWCC); John Maxwell (BRCC)
Source: Open NYS Lumen Courses
Type: Course
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The Information Literacy User’s Guide
Author: Authors: Deborah Bernnard, Greg Bobish, Jenna Hecker, Irina Holden, Allison Hosier, Trudi Jacobson, Tor Loney, and Daryl Bullis. Editors: Greg Bobish and Trudi Jacobson
Source: Open NYS Lumen Courses
Type: Course
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The Information Literacy User's Guide: An Open, Online Textbook
Author: Deborah Bernnard, University of Albany, Greg Bobish, University of Albany, Daryl Bullis, Babson College, Jenna Hecker, University of Albany, Irina Holden, University of Albany, Allison Hosier, University of Albany, Trudi Jacobson, University of Albany, Tor Loney, Albany Public Library
Publisher: Open SUNY
Source: Open Textbook Library
Type: Textbook
Description:
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Good researchers have a host of tools at their disposal that make navigating today’s complex information ecosystem much more manageable. Gaining the knowledge, abilities, and self-reflection necessary to be a good researcher helps not only in academic settings, but is invaluable in any career, and throughout one’s life. The Information Literacy User’s Guide will start you on this route to success. The Information Literacy User’s Guide is based on two current models in information literacy: The 2011 version of The Seven Pillars Model, developed by the Society of College, National and University Libraries in the United Kingdom and the conception of information literacy as a metaliteracy, a model developed by one of this book’s authors in conjunction with Thomas Mackey, Dean of the Center for Distance Learning at SUNY Empire State Col- lege.2 These core foundations ensure that the material will be relevant to today’s students. The Information Literacy User’s Guide introduces students to critical concepts of information literacy as defined for the information-infused and technology-rich environment in which they find themselves. This book helps students examine their roles as information creators and sharers and enables them to more effectively deploy related skills. This textbook includes relatable case studies and scenarios, many hands-on exercises, and interactive quizzes.
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Information Literacy: Research and Collaboration across Disciplines
Author: Barry Maid, Arizona State University
Publisher: WAC Clearinghouse
Source: Open Textbook Library
Type: Textbook
Description:
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This collection brings together scholarship and pedagogy from multiple perspectives and disciplines, offering nuanced and complex perspectives on Information Literacy in the second decade of the 21st century. Taking as a starting point the concerns that prompted the Association of Research Libraries (ACRL) to review the Information Literacy Standards for Higher Education and develop the Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education (2015), the chapters in this collection consider six frameworks that place students in the role of both consumer and producer of information within today's collaborative information environments. Contributors respond directly or indirectly to the work of the ACRL, providing a bridge between past/current knowledge and the future and advancing the notion that faculty, librarians, administrators, and external stakeholders share responsibility and accountability for the teaching, learning, and research of Information Literacy.
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Data Information Literacy
Author: Johnston (Ed.), Lisa
Publisher: Purdue University Press
Source: Directory of Open Access Books
Type: Open Access Book
Description:
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Given the increasing attention to managing, publishing, and preserving research datasets as scholarly assets, what competencies in working with research data will graduate students in STEM disciplines need to be successful in their fields? And what role can librarians play in helping students attain these competencies? In addressing these questions, this book articulates a new area of opportunity for librarians and other information professionals, developing educational programs that introduce graduate students to the knowledge and skills needed to work with research data. The term “data information literacy” has been adopted with the deliberate intent of tying two emerging roles for librarians together. By viewing information literacy and data services as complementary rather than separate activities, the contributors seek to leverage the progress made and the lessons learned in each service area.
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Preparing for Life in a Digital Age: The IEA International Computer and Information Literacy Study International Report
Author: Julian Fraillon
Publisher: Springer
Source: Directory of Open Access Books
Type: Open Access Book
Description:
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Ability to use information and communication technologies (ICT) is an imperative for effective participation in today’s digital age. Schools worldwide are responding to the need to provide young people with that ability. But how effective are they in this regard? The IEA International Computer and Information Literacy Study (ICILS) responded to this question by studying the extent to which young people have developed computer and information literacy (CIL), which is defined as the ability to use computers to investigate, create and communicate with others at home, school, the workplace and in society. The study was conducted under the auspices of the International Association for the Evaluation of Educational Achievement (IEA) and builds on a series of earlier IEA studies focusing on ICT in education. Data were gathered from almost 60,000 Grade 8 students in more than 3,300 schools from 21 education systems. This information was augmented by data from almost 35,000 teachers in those schools and by contextual data collected from school ICT-coordinators, school principals and the ICILS national research centers. The IEA ICILS team systematically investigated differences among the participating countries in students’ CIL outcomes, how participating countries were providing CIL-related education and how confident teachers were in using ICT in their pedagogical practice. The team also explored differences within and across countries with respect to relationships between CIL education outcomes and student characteristics and school contexts. In general, the study findings presented in this international report challenge the notion of young people as “digital natives” with a self-developed capacity to use digital technology. The large variations in CIL proficiency within and across the ICILS countries suggest it is naive to expect young people to develop CIL in the absence of coherent learning programs. Findings also indicate that system- and school-level planning needs to focus on increasing teacher expertise in using ICT for pedagogical purposes if such programs are to have the desired effect. The report furthermore presents an empirically derived scale and description of CIL learning that educational stakeholders can reference when deliberating about CIL education and use to monitor change in CIL over time.
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Information Literacy
Author: Tom Clark
Source: OpenStax CNX
Type: Course
License: Attribution
Description:
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Shaw University (Divinity School) developing information literacy curriculum.
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Information Literacy in a Theological Context
Author: Tom Clark
Source: OpenStax CNX
Type: Module
License: Attribution
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Information Literacy I
Author: TU Delft
Source: TU Delft OpenCourseWare
Type: Course
Description:
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During your studies you will frequently be asked to write a paper. For such a paper you will need information, but how do you get it?  What exactly do you need? Where can you find it? How do you go about it? Almost anyone can use Google, of course, but more is expected of a TU Delft student! We challenge you to go beyond using the popular search engines. This instruction will help you discover what there is to learn about information skills.Practical aspectsThis instruction will take approx. two hours to complete.If you have any questions during or after finishing the instruction, contact the Library Education Support team (educationsupport-lib@tudelft.nl).Good luck!
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Information Literacy II
Author: TU Delft
Source: TU Delft OpenCourseWare
Type: Course
Description:
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This instruction follows on from the online instruction Information Literacy 1, in which you learned how to find, evaluate and use information. Today’s instruction is intended for advanced users.Practical aspectsThis instruction will take approx. one hour to completeIf you have any questions during or after the instruction, contact the Library Education Support team (educationsupport-lib@tudelft.nl)Start now with the Learning Resources.Good luck!
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Information Literacy for Master’s and PhD students
Author: TU Delft
Source: TU Delft OpenCourseWare
Type: Course
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Welcome to this information literacy course for Master’s and PhD students. You probably already have some knowledge of information literacy, but if some of it has slipped your mind or if terms sound unfamiliar, this course includes links to information from the instructions for Bachelor’s students.Writing your Master’s thesis involves a number of different phases. You cannot simply start writing! You will first need extensive knowledge of the general field of research, in order to see where your subject fits in.
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Foundations of Information Literacy (Open Course)
Author: GALILEO, University System of Georgia
Source: Teaching Commons
Type: Course
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Information Literacy
Author: University of Northern Colorado
Source: Teaching Commons
Type: Course Material
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Data Information Literacy
Author: Carlson, Jake;Johnston, Lisa
Subject: Library Science
Publisher: Purdue University Press
Source: JSTOR Open Access Books
Type: Open Access Book
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